Killdozer (1974)

 

A meteorite crashes onto the Earth’s surface on an island off the coast of Africa. Countless years later, after natural forces have buried it and restored the local environment, six construction workers are boated to the island to begin work building an airstrip for an oil drilling company at the crash site, the uninhabited island.

King Lear (1987) – Jean-Luc Godard

 

King Lear is a 1987 film directed by Jean-Luc Godard, an adaptation of Shakespeare’s play in the style of experimental French New Wave cinema. The script was primarily by Peter Sellars and Tom Luddy, and was originally assigned to Norman Mailer. It is not a typical cinematic adaptation of Shakespeare’s tragedy King Lear, although some lines from the play are used in the film. Only three characters – Lear, Cordelia and Edgar – are common to both, and only Act I, scene 1 is given a conventional cinematic treatment in that two or three people actually engage in relatively meaningful dialogue.

King Lear is set in and around Nyon, Vaud, Switzerland, where Godard went to primary school. While many of Godard’s films are concerned with the invisible aspects of cinematography, the outward action of the film is centred on William Shakespeare Junior the Fifth, who is attempting to restore his ancestor’s plays in a world where most of human civilization—and more specifically culture—has been lost after the Chernobyl catastrophe.

Rather than reproducing a performance of Shakespeare’s play, the film is more concerned with the issues raised by the text, and symbolically explores the relationships between power and virtue, between fathers and daughters, words and images. The film deliberately does not use conventional Hollywood film-making techniques which make a film ‘watchable’, but instead seeks to alienate and baffle its audience in the manner of Berthold Brecht.

Get Yourself a College Girl (1964) – Preview Trailer

 

Get Yourself a College Girl, also released as The Swinging Set, is a 1964 Metrocolor film comedy in the style of a beach party movie. The plot involves a college co-ed who tries to balance her time writing songs and dealing with her publisher who tries to pursue her. It was directed by Sidney Miller and written by Robert E. Kent, and filmed at Sun Valley, Idaho, United States.

Turner Classic Movies critic Mel Neuhaus calls it “A curious 1964 hybrid of teen movie musical with pre-feminist overtones as well as a parody of moralistic anti-rock message films.” It is notable for the appearance of Astrud Gilberto, the Brazilian singer who sang the international hit song “The Girl from Ipanema”, appearing as herself in the film.

The Monster Club (1981)

 


The Monster Club is a 1981 British horror film directed by Roy Ward Baker and starring Vincent Price and John Carradine. An anthology film, it is based on the works of the British horror author R. Chetwynd-Hayes. It was the final film from Milton Subotsky who was best known for his work with Amicus Productions; Amicus were well known for their anthologies but this was not an Amicus film. It was also the final feature film directed by Baker.

The Mummy (1932)

 

The Mummy is a 1932 American pre-Code horror film directed by Karl Freund. The screenplay by John L. Balderston was from a story by Nina Wilcox Putnam and Richard Schayer. Released by Universal Studios, the film stars Boris Karloff, Zita Johann, David Manners, Edward Van Sloan and Arthur Byron. The film is about an ancient Egyptian mummy named Imhotep who is discovered by a team of archeologists and inadvertently brought back to life through a magic scroll. Disguised as a modern Egyptian, the mummy searches for his lost love, whom he believes has been reincarnated into a modern girl.

Don’t Deliver Us from Evil (1971)

 

Anne de Boissy and Lore Fournier are two adolescent Angevin girls who stay at a Catholic boarding school. Both have affluent and conservative families living in the countryside and on becoming friends and later lovers, the two decide to join forces in their malicious rebellion. When Anne’s parents take a long trip and leave Anne behind during summer vacation, Lore starts to stay with Anne at her château. They play some malicious games on two men: releasing the cows of the cowsherd Émile as well as setting fire to his home, and killing the pet birds of the mentally challenged gardener Léon. They store sacramental bread from church and prepare the abandoned chapel at the château for a mock marriage ceremony in which they dedicate themselves to Satan. One night, they meet a motorist who ran out of gasoline and invite him to the château. The girls seduce the man and when he attempts to rape Lore, he is killed by Anne. When a detective is sent and he finds clues linking them to the murder, the pair is convinced that the man’s body will be discovered and immolate themselves at a recital while reading poems by Baudelaire.

Glen or Glenda (1953)

 

Glen or Glenda is a 1953 American drama film written, directed by and starring Ed Wood (credited in his starring role as “Daniel Davis”), and featuring Bela Lugosi and Wood’s then-girlfriend Dolores Fuller.

The film is a docudrama about cross-dressing and transsexuality, and is semi-autobiographical in nature. Wood himself was a cross-dresser, and the film is a plea for tolerance. It is widely considered one of the worst films ever. However, it has become a cult film due to its low-budget production values and idiosyncratic style.

Creature from the Black Lagoon (1954)

 

Creature from the Black Lagoon is a 1954 American black-and-white 3D monster horror film from Universal-International, produced by William Alland, directed by Jack Arnold, that stars Richard Carlson, Julia Adams, Richard Denning, Antonio Moreno, and Whit Bissell. The Creature was played by Ben Chapman on land and by Ricou Browning underwater. The film premiered in Detroit on February 12 and was released on a regional basis, opening on various dates.

The Comedy of Terrors (1963)

 

The Comedy of Terrors is an American International Pictures horror comedy film directed by Jacques Tourneur and starring Vincent Price, Peter Lorre, Basil Rathbone, Boris Karloff, and (in a cameo) Joe E. Brown in his final film appearance. The film also features Orangey the cat, billed as “Rhubarb the Cat”. It is a blend of comedy and horror which features several cast members from Tales of Terror, made by AIP the year before.