Sources used in this post may include: wikipedia.org, imdb.com

Sources used in this post may include: wikipedia.org, imdb.com

Invasion of the Blood Farmers (1972)

 


Invasion of the Blood Farmers is a 1972 exploitation horror film directed by Ed Adlum and written by Adlum and Ed Kelleher. It starred Norman Kelley, Tanna Hunter and Bruce Detrick. The film centers around a group of druids called the “Sangroids” living in Westchester County, New York, who plan to resurrect their queen by draining the blood from unsuspecting civilians into her body.

Sources used in this post may include: wikipedia.org, imdb.com

Sources used in this post may include: wikipedia.org, imdb.com

The Thing with Two Heads (1972)

 

The Thing with Two Heads is a 1972 science-fiction film directed by Lee Frost. The film stars Ray Milland, Rosey Grier, Don Marshall, Roger Perry, Kathy Baumann, and Chelsea Brown.

Some early visual effects work from Rick Baker is also featured. The movie is known for its soundtrack, produced by MGM Records producer Michael Viner with a rotating cast of studio musicians that he called the Incredible Bongo Band.

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    Sources used in this post may include: wikipedia.org, imdb.com

    Bluebeard (1972)

     

    Bluebeard is a 1972 thriller starring Richard Burton, Raquel Welch, Joey Heatherton and Sybil Danning. The film is based on the classic story of Bluebeard by Charles Perrault of a wealthy aristocrat (Burton) who has murdered several previous wives. His latest spouse (Heatherton) discovers her dead predecessors in a freezer and tries to avoid their fate.

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      Sources used in this post may include: wikipedia.org, imdb.com

      Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (1972)

       


      Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1972) Part 1… by Phantomwise

      Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland is a 1972 British musical film based on the Lewis Carroll novel of the same name. It had an all star cast, and John Barry composed the score. In 1973, the film won the BAFTA Film Award at the BAFTA Awards Ceremony for Best Cinematography, won by Geoffrey Unsworth, and Best Costume Design, won by Anthony Mendleson.

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        Sources used in this post may include: wikipedia.org, imdb.com

        Frankenstein 80 (1972)

         

        Directed by Mario Mancini in 1972, Frankenstein 80 stars John Richardson, Gordon Mitchell plays Dr. Frankenstein, Renato Romano and Xiro Papas as the monster, Mosaico. It goes like this, Dr. Frankenstein works innocuously in his lab by day, at night, he works to perfect Mosaico, a monstrosity pieced together from dead bodies. Once completed, the monster escapes from the lab and embarks on a killing spree. Local beauties begin popping up dead, murdered in a variety of gruesome ways, as authorities attempt to stop the rampage. You gotta love 70’s monster movies especially Italian ones.


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          Sources used in this post may include: wikipedia.org, imdb.com

          The Triple Echo (1972)

           

          The Triple Echo is a 1972 film starring Glenda Jackson, Brian Deacon and Oliver Reed, and based on a novel by H. E. Bates. Brian Deacon played the deserter from the British Army. It is also known as Soldier in Skirts. The film was directed by Michael Apted.

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            Sources used in this post may include: wikipedia.org, imdb.com

            The Heartbreak Kid (1972)

             


            The original “The Heartbreak Kid” is a 1972 dark romantic comedy film directed by Elaine May, written by Neil Simon, and starring Charles Grodin, Jeannie Berlin, and Cybill Shepherd. It is based on the short story “A Change of Plan”, written by Bruce Jay Friedman. Grodin is great as usual and Jeannie Berlin was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. Eddie Albert was nominated for Best Supporting Actor.
            This gem checks in at #91 on AFI’s 100 Years – 100 Laughs, a list of the funniest movies ever made. A pathetic remake was attempted by the increasingly bad Farrelly brothers in 2007. Why is it that most movies suck nowadays? Oh, who cares, just enjoy this classic comedy.

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              Sources used in this post may include: wikipedia.org, imdb.com

              Beware The Blob (1972)

               

              https://youtu.be/p9mKQcmRg-Q
              Beware! The Blob, aka “Beware the Blob”, “Son of Blob” and “Son of the Blob”, is a 1972 sequel to horror science-fiction film The Blob. The film was directed by Larry Hagman. Yes, Major Nelson or if you prefer, J.R. Ewing directed this flick. The screenplay was penned by Anthony Harris and Jack Woods III, based on a story by Jack H. Harris and Richard Clair.

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                Sources used in this post may include: wikipedia.org, imdb.com

                Horror Express (1972-1973)

                 

                Horror Express, also known as Pánico en el Transiberiano in Spain where this horror flick was shot in 1972. It was directed by Eugenio Martin, written by Arnaud d’Usseau and Julian Zimet, and starring an all-star cast: Christopher Lee, Peter Cushing and Telly Savalas.

                Horror Express, also known as Pánico en el Transiberiano in Spain where this horror flick was shot in 1972. It was directed by Eugenio Martin, written by Arnaud d’Usseau and Julian Zimet, and starring an all-star cast: Christopher Lee, Peter Cushing and Telly Savalas.

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                  Sources used in this post may include: wikipedia.org, imdb.com

                  Dr. Jekyll y el Hombre Lobo (1972) – Short Movie Clip

                   

                  Movie: Dr. Jekyll y el Hombre Lobo (1972) also called Dr. Jekyll and the Wolfman in english.

                  Paul Naschy returns as El Hombre Lobo for the sixth time as he searches for a cure to his full moon maddness by visiting the grandson of the infamous Dr. Jekyll. What ensues next is a lover’s triangle, and a savage sadistic Mr. Hyde who roams modern London and transforms into a werewolf on the disco floor. Written by Humberto Amador”


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                    Sources used in this post may include: wikipedia.org, imdb.com

                    Solaris (1972)

                     

                    Solaris (Russian: Солярис, tr. Solyaris) is a 1972 Soviet science fiction art film adaptation of Polish author Stanisław Lem’s novel Solaris (1961). The film was co-written and directed by Andrei Tarkovsky. The film is a meditative psychological drama occurring mostly aboard a space station orbiting the fictional planet Solaris. The scientific mission has stalled because the skeleton crew of three scientists have fallen into separate emotional crises. Psychologist Kris Kelvin travels to the Solaris space station to evaluate the situation only to encounter the same mysterious phenomena as the others.

                    Solaris Tarkovsky by TECHNOLOGOS

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                      The original science fiction novel is about the ultimate inadequacy of communication between humans and other species. Tarkovsky’s adaptation is a “drama of grief and partial recovery” concentrated upon the thoughts and the consciences of the cosmonaut scientists studying Solaris’ mysterious ocean.[citation needed] In loyalty to the novel’s complex and slow-paced narrative, Tarkovsky wanted to bring a new emotional and intellectual depth to the genre, viewing most of western science fiction as shallow. The ideas which Tarkovsky tried to express in this film are further developed in Stalker (1979).

                      The critically successful Solaris features Natalya Bondarchuk (Hari), Donatas Banionis (Kris Kelvin), Jüri Järvet (Dr Snaut), Vladislav Dvorzhetsky (Henri Berton), Nikolai Grinko (Kris Kelvin’s Father), Olga Barnet (Kris Kelvin’s Mother), Anatoli Solonitsyn (Dr Sartorius), and Sos Sargsyan (Dr Gibarian); the music is by Johann Sebastian Bach and Eduard Artemyev. At the 1972 Cannes Film Festival, it won the Grand Prix Spécial du Jury, the FIPRESCI prize and was nominated for the Palme d’Or. The film is often cited as one of the greatest science fiction films in the history of cinema.

                      Sources used in this post may include: wikipedia.org, imdb.com

                      Last Tango in Paris (1972)

                       

                      LAST TANGO IN PARIS(1972) from wisdom on Veehd.

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                        Paul (Marlon Brando), a middle-aged American hotel owner mourning the suicide of his wife, meets a young engaged Parisian woman named Jeanne (Maria Schneider) in an apartment both are interested in renting. Paul and Jeanne proceed to have an anonymous sexual relationship in the apartment, and Paul demands that neither of them share any personal information, not even their names. The affair goes on until one day Jeanne comes to the apartment to find that Paul has, without warning, packed up and left.

                        Paul later meets Jeanne on the street and says that he wants to start anew with their relationship. He takes Jeanne to a Tango bar and begins telling her about himself. This loss of anonymity disillusions Jeanne about the relationship and she tells Paul she doesn’t want to see him again. Paul, not wanting to let Jeanne go, chases her back to her apartment and tells her that he loves her and wants to know her name.

                        Unbeknownst to Paul, Jeanne holds a gun (left by her late father) she had pulled from a drawer. She tells him her name and the gun goes off inexplicably. Paul makes his way out of the room, sticks his gum under the railing and falls dead onto her balcony. The audience then sees Jeanne, dazed- muttering to herself that he was just a stranger who tried to rape her, reassuring herself that she did not know who he was in a rehearsal for questioning by the police.

                        Sources used in this post may include: wikipedia.org, imdb.com

                        The Adventurer (1972)

                         


                        Basically an updating of Gene Barry’s “Amos Burke, Secret Agent” character, Gene Bradley is a wealthy government agent, who, posing as an American movie star, travels the globe in search of adventure, intrigue and danger. Written by Marty McKee <mmckee@soltec.net>

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                          Trivia: In 1975 Barry Morse played Professor Victor Bergman in the sci fi series “Space: 1999” (1975). He did not return in the second season and was replaced by his “The Adventurer” co-star Catherine Schell as the morphing alien Maya.

                          Sources used in this post may include: wikipedia.org, imdb.com

                          Angels’ Wild Women (1972)

                           


                          Angels’ Wild Women (1972)

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                            “”

                            • Director: Al Adamson
                            • Run Time:
                              85 min | Portugal:82 min (2003 re-release)
                            • Country: USA
                            • Genre: Action See »

                            Tagline: Hot, Hard and Mean…Too Tough for Any Man! They’ll Beat ’em, Treat ’em, and Eat ’em Alive!

                            Goofs: Continuity: During the big brawl near the end of the film various close-ups and alternating camera angles show that the white GMC pickup truck switches several times between having the tailgate facing the buildings and the front of the truck facing the buildings. One camera shot even shows that a horse-drawn wagon is seen in front of the buildings when it was not previously located there.

                            Sources used in this post may include: wikipedia.org, imdb.com

                            Fellini’s Roma (1972) – Short Movie Clip

                             

                            Movie: Fellini’s Roma (1972)

                            A virtually plotless, gaudy, impressionistic portrait of Rome through the eyes of one of its most famous citizens. blending autobiography (a reconstruction of Fellini’s own arrival in Rome during the Mussolini years; a trip to a brothel and a music-hall) with scenes from present-day Roman life (a massive traffic jam on the autostrada; a raucous journey through Rome after dark; following an archaeological team through the site of the Rome subways; an unforgettable ecclesiastical fashion show) Written by Michael Brooke <michael@everyman.demon.co.uk>
                            Goofs: Anachronisms: Peter Gonzales Falcon’s hairstyles are all in the longish 1972 mode, even though the portions of the film in which he appears are supposed to be taking place thirty or years earlier, at which time men’s hair was cut much, much shorter, and would never be worn as it appears in this film.

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                              Sources used in this post may include: wikipedia.org, imdb.com