Glen or Glenda (1953)

 

Glen or Glenda is a 1953 American drama film written, directed by and starring Ed Wood (credited in his starring role as “Daniel Davis”), and featuring Bela Lugosi and Wood’s then-girlfriend Dolores Fuller.

The film is a docudrama about cross-dressing and transsexuality, and is semi-autobiographical in nature. Wood himself was a cross-dresser, and the film is a plea for tolerance. It is widely considered one of the worst films ever. However, it has become a cult film due to its low-budget production values and idiosyncratic style.

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    Sources used in this post may include: wikipedia.org, imdb.com

    Bela Lugosi Meets a Brooklyn Gorilla (1952)

     

    On their way to perform in Guam for the troops, nightclub performers Duke Mitchell and Sammy Petrillo find themselves stranded on a seemingly treacherous island, known by the natives as “Kola Kola”. The natives are quite friendly, especially Nona, the tribal chief’s daughter, who tries to help the two get off the island. Though Paradise has been found, for the time being, the duo soon discovers that a mad scientist named Dr. Zabor (Bela Lugosi) lives on the other side of the island. Seeing a chance to get help, the two visit the strange doctor. Tension mounts as Duke falls in love with Nona. Seeing Duke as a threat, a jealous Dr. Zabor plans to literally make a monkey out of Duke, for he too loves Nona. Sammy tries to help his pal, with unexpected results.

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      Sources used in this post may include: wikipedia.org, imdb.com

      Murders in the Rue Morgue (1932)

       

      Murders in the Rue Morgue is a 1932 American Pre-Code horror film, very loosely based on Edgar Allan Poe’s short story “The Murders in the Rue Morgue”. Bela Lugosi, one year after his performance as Dracula, portrays a lunatic scientist who abducts women and injects them with blood from his ill-tempered caged ape. Karl Freund’s cinematography and Robert Florey’s direction have been praised by critics and characterized as “expressionistic” by Leonard Maltin. Despite the film being pre-Code, violent sequences prompted Universal to cut its running time from 80 minutes to 61 minutes.

      This film was produced as a compensatory package for Lugosi and Florey, after both were dropped from 1931’s Frankenstein. Lugosi had originally been cast as Dr. Frankenstein, and the film was to be directed by Florey, who had been developing the coveted project. Lugosi was subsequently demoted to play the mute monster, however, which he claimed to have turned down. Florey was replaced as director by James Whale, as producer Carl Laemmle was both unsatisfied with Florey’s work on the project, and had given Whale first choice of any Universal property at the time. The box office results for Murders in the Rue Morgue were disappointing, and Lugosi’s original Universal contract for Dracula was not extended. Today, however, the film is generally well-regarded by critics and is considered a cult classic.

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        Sources used in this post may include: wikipedia.org, imdb.com

        Sources used in this post may include: wikipedia.org, imdb.com

        White Zombie (1932)

         

        White Zombie is considered the first feature length zombie film. A sequel to the film, titled Revolt of the Zombies, opened in 1936. Modern reception to White Zombie has been more positive since its initial release. Critics have praised the atmosphere of the film, leading it comparisons to the 1940s horror film productions of Val Lewton, while others still have an unfavorable opinion on the quality of acting from the cast.

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          Sources used in this post may include: wikipedia.org, imdb.com

          Scared to Death (1947)

           

          Scared to Death (1947) is a horror film directed by Christy Cabanne and starring Bela Lugosi. It was filmed in Cinecolor, is one of only three color pictures Lugosi made, and the only one he starred in. The film is notable for its narration by a dead woman — she describes the events leading up to her death.


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            Sources used in this post may include: wikipedia.org, imdb.com

            The Devil Bat (1940)

             


            The Devil Bat is a black-and-white comedy-horror movie which was produced by Producers Releasing Corporation (PRC) and directed by Jean Yarbrough. The film stars the well known horror actor Béla Lugosi, along with Suzanne Kaaren, Guy Usher, Yolande Mallott, and the comic team of Dave O’Brien and Donald Kerr as the protagonists.

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              Sources used in this post may include: wikipedia.org, imdb.com