Orson Welles: The One-Man Band (1995)


One Man Band, also known as London and Swinging London is an unfinished short film made by Orson Welles between 1968 and 1971. The film started life as a part of a 90-minute TV special for CBS, entitled Orson’s Bag, consisting of Welles’ 40-minute condensation of The Merchant of Venice, and assorted sketches around Europe. This was abandoned in 1969 when CBS withdrew their funding over Welles’ long-running disputes with US authorities regarding his tax status, he continued to fashion the footage in his own style.

Sources used in this post may include: wikipedia.org, imdb.com

The Stranger (1946)


The Stranger (1946) is an American film noir directed by Orson Welles and starring Welles, Edward G. Robinson, and Loretta Young. The film was based on an Oscar-nominated screenplay written by Victor Trivas. Sam Spiegel was the film’s producer, and the film’s musical score is by Bronisław Kaper. It is believed that this is the first film released after World War II that showed footage of concentration camps.

Sources used in this post may include: wikipedia.org, imdb.com

The Immortal Story (1968)


Watch The Immortal Story (1968, Orson Welles) in Drama | View More Free Videos Online at Veoh.com

The Immortal Story is a 1968 French film directed by Orson Welles and starring Jeanne Moreau. The film was originally broadcast on French television and was later released in theaters. It was based on a short story by the Danish writer Isak Dinesen. With a running time of 58 minutes, it is the shortest feature film directed by Welles.

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Sources used in this post may include: wikipedia.org, imdb.com

Chimes at Midnight (1965) – aka Falstaff


Sir John Falstaff is the hero in this compilation of extracts from Shakespeare’s ‘Henry IV’ and other plays, made into a connected story of Falstaff’s career as young Prince Hal’s drinking companion. The massive knight roisters with and without the prince, philosophizes comically, goes to war, and meets his final disappointment, set in a real-looking late-medieval England.

The film was nominated (in 1968) for a BAFTA film award for Welles as Best Foreign Actor. At the Cannes Film Festival Welles was nominated (in 1966) for the Golden Palm Award and won the 20th Anniversary Prize and the Technical Grand Prize. In Spain it won (in 1966) the Citizens Writers Circle Award for Best Film.

Sources used in this post may include: wikipedia.org, imdb.com

The Man Who Saw Tomorrow (1981)


Nostradamus – The man who saw tomorrow – Orson Welles from Observer1964 on Vimeo.

The Man Who Saw Tomorrow is narrated by Orson Welles. The film depicts many of Nostradamus‘ predictions for the modern world, as interpreted by the many linguistic scholars who have translated his works. In addition, some biographical information is provided about Nostradamus, including his work as a physician during the plagues which swept Europe in the 16th century.

Sources used in this post may include: wikipedia.org, imdb.com

The Third Man (1949)


Movie: The Third Man (1949)
An out of work pulp fiction novelist, Holly Martins, arrives in a post war Vienna divided into sectors by the victorious allies, and where a shortage of supplies has lead to a flourishing black market. He arrives at the invitation of an ex-school friend, Harry Lime, who has offered him a job, only to discover that Lime has recently died in a peculiar traffic accident. From talking to Lime’s friends and associates Martins soon notices that some of the stories are inconsistent, and determines to discover what really happened to Harry Lime. Written by Mark Thompson <mrt@oasis.icl.co.uk>

Trivia: Rumors have long since been widespread that Orson Welles wrote all of Harry Lime’s dialogue and even that he took over the direction of his own scenes. Everyone involved, including Welles himself, have always insisted that the film was directed by only Carol Reed. Welles did claim that he wrote most of Lime’s dialogue, which is also a fabrication. The extent of Welles’ contributions were Lime’s grumbling about his stomach problems (which were improvisations) and the famous “cuckoo clock” spiel at the end of the ferris wheel scene.

Sources used in this post may include: wikipedia.org, imdb.com